Narrow-body airliners

A smaller, more common class of airliners is the narrow-body or single aisle aircraft. These smaller airliners are generally used for medium-distance flights with fewer passengers than their wide-body counterparts. Examples include the Boeing 717, 737, 757, McDonnell Douglas DC-9 and MD-80/MD-90 series, Airbus A320 family, Tupolev Tu-204, Tu-214, Embraer E-Jets 190&195 and Tu-334. Older airliners like the Boeing 707, 727, Caravelle, Douglas DC-8, Fokker F70/F100, VC10, Tupolev, and Yakovlev jets also fit into this category. A narrow-body aircraft (also known as a single aisle aircraft) is an airliner with a fuselage aircraft cabin width typically of 3 to 4 metres (10 to 13 ft), and airline seat arranged 2 to 6 abreast along a single aisle. Narrow-body aircraft with a range not allowing transatlantic or transcontinental flights are commonly known as regional airliners. In contrast, a wide-body aircraft is a larger airliner and is usually configured with multiple travel classes with a fuselage diameter of 5 to 7 metres (16 to 20 ft) and twin aisles. Passengers are usually seated 7 to 10 abreast. For comparison, typical wide-body aircraft can accommodate between 200 and 600 passengers, while the largest narrow-body aircraft currently in widespread service (the Boeing 757300) carries a maximum of about 250 275. The Boeing 717 is a twin-engine, single-aisle jet airliner, developed for the 100-seat market. The airliner was designed and marketed by McDonnell Douglas as the MD-95, a third-generation deriva

ive of the DC-9. Capable of seating of up to 117 passengers, the 717 has maximum range of 2,060 nautical miles (3,820 km). The aircraft is powered by two Rolls-Royce BR715 turbofan engines. The first order was placed in October 1995; McDonnell Douglas and Boeing merged in 1997[2] prior to production, and the first planes entered service in 1999 as the Boeing 717. Production ceased in May 2006 after 156 were produced.[3] Background Douglas Aircraft developed the DC-9 to be a short-range companion to their larger four engined DC-8 in the early 1960s. The DC-9 was an all-new design, using two rear fuselage-mounted Pratt & Whitney JT8D turbofan engines, a small, highly efficient wing, and a T-tail. The DC-9 first flew in 1965 and entered airline service later that year. When production ended in 1982 a total of 976 DC-9s had been produced. The McDonnell Douglas MD-80 series was introduced into airline service in 1980. The design was the second generation of the DC-9. It was a lengthened DC-9-50 with a higher maximum take-off weight (MTOW) and higher fuel capacity, as well as next-generation Pratt and Whitney JT8D-200 series engines. Nearly 1,200 MD-80s were delivered from 1980 to 1999. The MD-90 was developed from the MD-80 series. It was launched in 1989 and first flew in 1993. The MD-90 was longer, and featured a glass cockpit (electronic instrumentation) and more powerful, quieter, fuel efficient V2525-D5 engines, with the option of upgrading that to a V2528 engine. Only 117 MD-90 airliners were built.